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[B.C. GOLD RUSH WEEKLY NEWSPAPER]. The Cariboo Sentinel: Vol. 1. No. 12.
Barkerville, Williams Creek, British Columbia: Saturday, August 19, 1865. On a double Elephant Folio leaf(ca. 40,5x29,5 cm or 16 x 11 ½ in). Four pages. With Two page Supplement laid in. Period pencil note "30 cops. Exp. Acc. F.J. Barnard" in the right upper corner; blue stamp "M.W. WAITT & Co. Govt. St. VICTORIA" in the left upper corner. Light staining along fold lines, chipping on the upper edge, but overall a very good copy.
Very rare as only four runs of the newspaper located in Worldcat.
One of the first issues of this almost legendary goldfields newspaper inscribed by a prominent BC businessman and politician, the founder of famous Barnard’s Express: Francis Jones Barnard (1829-1889).
The inscription ordered to send 30 copies of the newspaper to the office of a Victoria bookseller, publisher and news agent M.W. Waitt & Co. (probably, on Barnard’s personal account). The reason for this was most likely the article letter from Victoria written anonymously by a member of the Legislature, which presented a lengthy defense of Union of the Colonies of BC and Vancouver Island, based partly on the value of the Cariboo miners to the Island economy and, reciprocally, the value of free trade to the miners (the union was concluded in 1866).
"The Cariboo Sentinel was published in Barkerville, in the Cariboo region of central British Columbia, and ran from June 1865 to October 1875. At the time, Barkerville was home to a fast-growing community of miners who had been attracted to the Cariboo region by the discovery of gold. The Sentinel was published by George Wallace, and its stated objective was not only to disseminate "mining intelligence," but also to eradicate "official abuse[s]" of power, both within the Cariboo region and beyond (vol. 1, no. 1, p. 2)" (UBC Library Catalogue).
"Francis Jones Barnard, often known as Frank Barnard Sr., was a prominent British Columbia businessman and Member of Parliament in Canada from 1879 to 1887. Most famously, Barnard was the founder of the B.X. Express freighting company ("Barnard's Express"), which was the main cartage and passenger services company on the Cariboo Road. His son, Sir Francis Stillman Barnard, often known as Frank Barnard Jr., later became the Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia.
It was his next enterprise, begun in the fall of 1860, that would grow to become the B.X. Express one of the most important companies in the early history of the Colony, and which would remain in business for decades. He began by carrying mail and newspapers, on foot, all the way from Yale to the goldfield towns of the Cariboo, a 760-mile roundtrip journey, charging $2 per letter and selling newspapers in the goldfields for $1 a copy. In 1861 and 1862 he also carried packages between Yale and New Westminster, a distance of 200 miles, and in 1862 established a one-horse pony express, with himself as sole rider, serving the Cariboo from Yale, where he met with services from New Westminster and Yale provided by Dietz & Nelson (one of the partners in which was the later Lieutenant-Governor Hugh Nelson) and couriered reliably from there to Barkerville. On his return journeys, he became entrusted with shipments of gold dust, and managed to reliably and safely convey earnings from the goldfields to Yale despite the ever-present risk of robbery, in addition to the difficulties posed by distance, climate, and the difficult canyon and plateau trails.
With the completion of the first section of the Old Cariboo Road to Soda Creek in 1862 , Barnard used his own acquired capital and found a backer to launch Barnard's Express and Stage Line with fourteen six-horse coaches and a famous team of "crack whips" to drive them, including legendary drivers Steve Tingley and Billy Ballou. The onset of the busiest phase of movement of miners and goods to and from the Cariboo Gold Rush began that year, and Barnard's new company prospered from a buys trade in services for passengers, freight, letters, newspapers and gold dust, and in 1864 was able to expand his business further with the purchase of more rolling stock and also in winning the government contract to carry the mail. Barnard was also able to encourage the government to end the gold escort with the result that his company's coaches, equipped with armed guardsmen, would be fully in charge of the movement of gold from the Cariboo to the Coast. In 1866 Barnard bought out Dietz and Nelson and so came into control of the bulk of business connecting Victoria to Barkerville, as he was now in control of shipments between Victoria and Yale as well as from Yale northwards" (Wikipedia).

$1500USD



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